Course Descriptions

THE SPIRITUALITY OF THE REFORMATION
Why did Reformed Protestants love psalm-singing while Lutherans loved the chorale? How was marriage and family life envisioned in the sixteenth century? How did perceptions of art and sacred space change in the sixteenth century? What did new forms of worship look like? How did Erasmus, Luther, Calvin, Ignatius, Teresa of Avila, Wesley and so many others teach people to pray? This course examines the dynamic intersection between reform movements and Christian spirituality. Moments of reform, retrieval, and renewal are examined from the high middle ages through the sixteenth century reformations and then the text closes with the pietistic movements of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Through seminars and colorful lectures, we will see that religious change both shaped and was shaped by patterns of liturgy and devotion, attitudes toward art and the material context of devotion, mysticism, monasticism, pilgrimage, and certainly the character of public worship and private prayer. Throughout, we will consider the dynamic relationship between Christian thought and Christian practice to better appreciate the ascetical background of many contemporary churches today. Research methods and tools will also be discussed as students prepare final papers. In terms of discipline, then, this course is both Church History and Christian Spirituality / Ascetical Theology. This course is reflective of Dr. Lane’s upcoming book from Fortress Press, Spirituality and Reform: Christianity, c1000-c1800.
DMin METHODS COURSE
Students gain practical experience in the various theoretical approaches to research at the post-graduate level. Particular emphasis is given to ethnography, the science of accurately identifying, recording, and analyzing social phenomenon from the perspective of the people being studied. Students will workshop their DMin project proposals with their peers. Contemporary bibliographic and online research skills are included among the learning outcomes for this course.
AUGUSTINE'S THEOLOGY
"Credo ut intelligam - I believe so that I may understand." This advanced elective will explore aspects of Augustine of Hippo's theology of God, Creation, and Salvation by thorough engagement with critical editions of primary texts. In addition to lectures and a final research project, students will prepare and participate in seminar-style discussions. MDiv-level Historical Theology and/or Systematic Theology are prerequisites.
ASCETICAL THEOLOGY
AT 601: SPIRITUALITY FOR MINISTRY
This course will continue to study the history of Christian spirituality from the Reformation onwards, with special attention given to “English spirituality.” The second half of the course is focused on priesthood and Christian spirituality in ministry; in particular the priest’s role as spiritual guide and confessor.
BIBLE STUDIES
OT 502: INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL HEBREW 2
Building on the skills learned in Hebrew 1, this course concentrates on syntax and translation. Students will learn how Hebrew words function in clauses and sentences both by working through an intermediate grammar on syntax and by translating from a selected book of the Old Testament. Conducted in seminar format, each class period reviews grammatical concepts, introduces and discusses lessons of Hebrew syntax and translates an assigned number of verses. Students will rotate leading the class discussion of the translations. Regular attention will also be given to LXX readings of the assigned translation to emphasize the LXX’s traditional and text-critical contribution to the process of exegesis.
NT 502: INTRODUCTION TO BIBLICAL GREEK 2
Greek 2 completes the introduction to the rudiments of the Koiné Greek which was begun in Greek 1. In addition to reviewing all that was learned in Greek 1, aspects of vocabulary and morphology left aside in Greek 1 will be introduced and learned. The student completing this course should be able to translate easy to moderate passages of the Greek New Testament (e.g., Johannine writings, Mark, Matthew, some passages in Paul) when supplied with vocabulary occurring fewer than 30 times. Greek 1 or its equivalent is a prerequisite for Greek 2.
OT 512: INTRODUCTION TO OLD TESTAMENT 2
This course continues in the same manner as Old Testament 1 by examining the Prophets, Poetical Books (Psalms and Wisdom Literature) and the remaining books in the Old Testament (i.e. Daniel, Ezra, Esther, etc.). The Deuterocanonicals will also receive brief treatment. Additional attention is given to issues in Old Testament Studies such as “Ethics”, “Old Testament Theology”, etc.
NT 512: INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT: FROM ACTS TO REVELATION
Beginning with the Acts of the Apostles, each of the non- Gospel writings of the New Testament is introduced and surveyed in terms of content, literary structure, critical issues, and theological emphases. The course also examines the life, theology, and soteriology of Paul, and the development of the kerygma, incipient creedal formulae, ministry, and sacraments in the New Testament.
OT 511-512 D: OLD TESTAMENT SURVEY
This course is the hybrid-distance learning equivalent of Introduction to the Old Testament 1 and 2. It is designed to introduce students to the Old Testament as Christian Scripture for the ministry and mission of the church. After addressing key interpretive issues, the course surveys the contents of the Old Testament with a focus on the historical context, literary shape, and theological message of each book. At the end of the course, students should have a new appreciation for the Old Testament as an integrated whole, and for its potential as a resource for the Christian journey.
OT 715-BI 715: OLD TESTAMENT NARATIVE
All humans tell stories. Narrative is a fundamental way that we make sense of our world and our place within it. In Holy Scripture, God tells us the grand story of our salvation. That means that the New Testament is best understood as the conclusion of the long story that begins in Genesis 1. This course will explore the sophisticated literary art of Old Testament narratives. Topics of study will include narrative theory, the conventions of Hebrew narrative, characterization, setting, plot, and ways of ending stories. This course will train students to become more attentive and competent interpreters of narrative texts toward the end of preaching and teaching in the Christian Church.
CHURCH HISTORY & HISTORICAL THEOLOGY
CH 501: PATRISTIC AND MEDIEVAL CHURCH HISTORY
This course is a survey/overview of Church History, with focus on the Patristic and Medieval periods. The objective of this course is for the student to gain a general grasp of Church History and of the relevance and importance of these formative periods of the Church’s life. Students in preparation for ministry should be able to give an account of the Church’s development and have an understanding of its context for today. Attention will be paid to the roots and influences of these periods on the development of the Anglican Communion.
HT 501: CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY IN THE PATRISTIC AND THE EARLY MEDIEVAL PERIODS
This, the first of two courses in historical theology, examines theology from the second through the twelfth centuries seeking to understand how certain figures, movements, and controversies have helped to shape the development of Christian theology. Special attention will be given to key Patristic theological works and to the Ecumenical Councils of the Church.
CH 501-502 D: THE HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY
This course is an introduction to the history of Christianity from the post-apostolic age to the present. We will examine significant themes from the church’s history with special attention given to those that bear upon the Anglican Communion and its continuity with Catholic Christianity. Particular individuals, movements, events, and ideas will be examined in each of the major periods of this history, displaying the dynamic relationship between belief and practice, Christ and culture, and the priestly and prophetic witness of Christian communities in varied global contexts. Emphasis is also placed on application within the students‟ ministry context. The goal of this course is to introduce students to the general scope of Christian history. Upon completion, students will be able to identify key themes, dates, personalities, and events.
HT 501-502 D: HISTORICAL THEOLOGY
This course explores the history of western Christian thought from its beginnings in the patristic era to its contemporary expressions. The course will use a broad scheme of historical periodization (patristic, medieval, reformation, modern) to subdivide these roughly 2000 years of theological reflection. The course will focus on several key figures, movements, and controversies that have shaped the development of Christian theology.
CH 601-602 D: ANGLICAN HISTORY
What is Anglicanism? What do Anglicans believe? These are frequent questions, but they sometimes feel surprisingly difficult to answer. This class aims to lay a foundation for grappling with the question of Anglican identity, by looking at the history that has shaped Anglicanism from the Reformation to the present day, and through considering some of the themes which have shaped our tradition, such as the influence of the Enlightenment, the effect of various revival movements, and the questions posed by global Anglicanism.
  
CHURCH MUSIC
CM630-I: CHURCH MUSICIANS WORKSHOP
This course is built upon the Church Musicians Workshop residential intensive program offered at Nashotah House. Drawing upon the hands-on coaching and group masterclasses of the CMW, this course adds assigned reading, a research assignment, and guided service planning assignments, students will appreciate the history and breadth of practice in contemporary sacred music and liturgy and reflectively plan a series of Sunday-morning liturgies based on a narrative understanding of the liturgy (liturgy as proclamation), using the approved sources and texts of their jurisdiction. Building on the tracks offered in the CMW, students work towards mastery of the chanted music expected of officiants/celebrants/liturgical presidents and planning appropriate music for a variety of contexts using the "Liturgical Soundtrack" approach. (www.churchmusiciansworkshop.org)
CULTURE & MISSION
MS 501-502 D: CHURCH AND CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY
This course is an introduction to Christian engagement with issues in contemporary American culture based upon practical theological methods (theology in dialogue with the practices of everyday life). The objective of the course is to raise awareness of issues related to Gospel proclamation and engagement with American culture in order to see Christian practical theology as transforming practice and engaging society through the local church.
LITURGICS
LT 601: PASTORAL LITURGY
The goal of this course is to integrate previous study within the task of planning and leading parish worship. All the sacraments and rites of the Book of Common Prayer are explicated with regards to their use in the parish while keeping in mind their historical and theological dimensions.
LT530-532B-R: Liturgy and Church Music Practicum
This course explores the history of Christian church music and introduces basic musical skills necessary for liturgical officiating. Each student is expected to become proficient in reading music, chanting, pointing collects and lessons, and an appropriate level of keyboard ability. The development of liturgical music from the early church to the present provides the framework for examining plainsong, Anglican chant, psalmody, and hymnody. Liturgical and musical terms are learned in their historical context.
LT 501-601 D: LITURGY
The purpose of this course is to equip students with knowledge of the theology, history and ceremonial practices of Christian liturgy, with a particular focus on the Anglican and Anglo-Catholic traditions, and to assist in their formation as liturgical leaders who are both knowledgeable and capable.
 LT701-I: Advanced Liturgics: An Introduction to Sources & Methods

This course will introduce students to the sources of liturgical study and the major methodological approaches that have been employed, in order to prepare them for scholarly research. The patristic and medieval sources studied from both East and West include the liturgical books (sacramentaries, pontificals, rituals, lectionaries, etc), rubrical and ceremonial documents, the liturgical portions of ancient church orders, and descriptive documents (mystagogical catecheses, commentaries, homilies). The course also will introduce students to the major methodologies in liturgical study, including the philological, structural, and comparative approaches, as well as application of anthropological ritual studies. Prerequisite: LT501 or an approved equivalent.
PRACTICAL THEOLOGY & CHRISTIAN LEADERSHIP
HM 501: PRINCIPLES OF PREACHING
An introduction to the craft of sermon preparation and delivery. The significance of preaching, the importance of exegetical research, and the value of image, story, and metaphor in proclaiming the Gospel are emphasized. Students do a number of practical exercises to develop the different skills necessary for good preaching.
PM 510/511: SUPERVISED PRACTICE OF MINISTRY (SPM)
This required component of the Master of Divinity program consists of two terms of mentored ministry, usually in a parish, under the supervision of a seminary- approved priest/mentor. All such placements are made in consultation with and with the approval of the Director of Field Education. Parish-based Field Education does not earn academic credit.
HM 601: EXPERIENCE IN PREACHING
An intensive laboratory experience in the preparation and delivery of sermons. Students are encouraged to develop their preaching skills in a variety of different homiletical formats and liturgical contexts.
PM 501-601 D: THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MINISTRY
Theory and Practice of Ministry is, as its title indicates, a survey of the theology, theory, and practice of ministry. The goal of the course is to immerse the student in the theory undergirding the act of pastoral ministry and to give students opportunities to enter into its practice in a supervised manner.
PM 501: PRIEST AS LEADER
This course provides a theological and theoretical basis for understanding Christian Priesthood as apostolic leadership in the Missio Dei, emphasizing the role and character of the Priest in both Church order and in mission. The course highlights apostolic, prophetic, evangelistic, catechetical and pastoral leadership for the proclamation of the Gospel and the care of souls as taught by St. Paul (Ephesians 4:11-16). In addition to considering self-analysis and the role of the Priest in the mission of the Church, it will also explore Christian education, and responding to pastoral crises.
  
READING COURSES

Reading courses are designed as for-credit tutorial courses and may be accepted as electives, or, in unusual circumstances and as approved by the Academic Dean, in lieu of required courses in a degree program. Reading courses must be approved by the Faculty upon request of the student and recommendation of the instructor proposing to teach the course. The subject of study must be chosen and a bibliography developed by the student in consultation with the instructor. A written plan for the Reading Course with a title and a description of the study plan must be presented by the instructor to the Faculty prior to the time of normal course registration. Periodic written assignments and discussion as well as an examination or submission of a major paper will generally form the basis for evaluation and grading by the instructor. A reading course must be completed prior to the end of the exam period for the term in which it has been registered.

Permission to take a reading course in the January or summer semester breaks will be contingent upon both the professor’s availability and willingness to undertake such work out of term and the student’s other commitments. Professors are encouraged to have seasons available for their own research and refreshment. Students are discouraged from taking a reading course concurrent with a Field Education elective such a CPE or TPP.

Restrictions: (1) Residential and Distance Students may take reading courses for no more than six credit hours of required electives or in lieu of other required courses without permission of the Academic Dean and Faculty upon written petition; (2) Reading courses are available only with Regular or Affiliate Nashotah House faculty.

Reading Courses will be identified with the following prefix in the discipline (e.g., NT, AT, ST, CH).

  • 699 for an intermediate level course;
  • 799 for an STM research elective;
  • 899 for a DMin reading course.
SYSTEMATIC & MORAL THEOLOGY
MT 501: ETHICS AND FUNDAMENTAL MORAL THEOLOGY
This course provides an introduction to the foundations of a contemporary Anglican approach to Moral Theology, or “Christian Ethics.” Primary attention is given to an exploration of basic Christian moral principles, and the course includes reflection upon the scope and purpose of moral theology, the importance for moral theology of the basic structure of Christian Doctrine, and the consequences for moral theology of various alternatives in theoretical or philosophical ethics. The course concludes with two short units, one on the use of Scripture in ethics, the other on moral principles and public policy that prepare students to approach specific issues in ethics during their second course in Ethics and Moral Theology (MT 601).
ST 502: SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 2
This course in Systematic Theology gives an overview of particular Christian doctrines (Atonement, Original Sin, Anthropology, Salvation, the Church, the Sacraments, and Eschatology) from their biblical foundations through their historical developments to their modern expressions. It understands Christian doctrine as, “What the Church of Jesus Christ believes, teaches, and confesses on the basis of the Word of God.” Particular attention is given to how Anglicans have understood and received these doctrines of the Christian faith and the role they play in the life of the individual and the Church.
MT 501-601 D: ETHICS AND MORAL THEOLOGY
This distance learning version of Ethics and Moral Theology combines in one course these two aims: (1) providing a basis in the reading of scripture and thinking theologically and philosophically about ethical issues; and (2) applying an informed Christian perspective to contemporary ethical issues. The residential week will emphasize the scriptural, philosophical, and historical background, and the online component will focus on a Christian virtue theory and selected issues in applied ethics.
ST 501-502 D: INTRODUCTION TO CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY
This course is an introduction to Christian theology. It is designed to give the student an overview of particular Christian doctrines from their biblical foundations through their historical developments to their modern expressions. Particular attention will be given to how Anglicans have understood and received these doctrines of the Christian faith and the role they play in the life of the individual and the Church.